what have you learnt about poetry from this poem?

Hey guys,
first thing first, I’m supposed to analyse a poem and reflect on it. so here’s the poem:
The Mother by Robert William Service
Your children grow from you apart,
Afar and still afar;
And yet it should rejoice your heart
To see how glad they are;
In school and sport, in work and play,
And last, in wedded bliss
How others claim with joy to-day
The lips you used to kiss.

Your children distant will become,
And wide the gulf will grow;
The lips of loving will be dumb,
The trust you used to know
Will in another’s heart repose,
Another’s voice will cheer . . .
And you will fondle baby clothes
And brush away a tear.

But though you are estranged almost,
And often lost to view,
How you will see a little ghost
Who ran to cling to you!
Yet maybe children’s children will
Caress you with a smile . . .
Grandmother love will bless you still,–
Well, just a little while.

I’m supposed to reflect on what I’ve learnt about POETRY from this poem. I really have no idea how to write it. There’s not much assonance, personification so i can’t say much about them.
There’s rhyme and a rhythm so i can say "a poem doesn’t need rhyme"

THANKS.

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Can you help me identify the meaning of this poem?

Here is the poem that I am wondering about. What does it mean to you??

Eagle Plain

Robert Francis

The American eagle is not aware he is
the American eagle. He is never tempted
to look modest.

When orators advertise the American eagle’s
virtues, the American eagle is not listening.
This is his virtue.

He is somewhere else, he is mountains away
but even if he were near he would never
make an audience.

The American eagle never says he will serve
if drafted, will dutifully serve etc. He is
not at our service.

If we have honored him we have honored one
who unequivocally honors himself by
overlooking us.

He does not know the meaning of magnificent.
Perhaps we do not altogether either
who cannot touch him

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What do you think of this poem, what do you think it means?

Breath Is Enough

I draw sweet air
Deeply and long,
As pure as prayer,
As sweet as song.
Where lilies glow
And roses wreath,
Heart-joy I know
Is just to breathe.

Aye, so I think
By shore or sea,
As deep I drink
Of purity.
This brave machine,
Bare to the buff,
I keep ice-clean,
Breath is enough.

From mountain stream
To covert cool
The world, I deem,
Is wonderful;
The great, the small,
The smooth, the rough,
I love it all,–
Breath is enough.

Robert W. Service

———–

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Help analyze this poem, should be an easy one?

“There’s something in your face, Michael, I’ve seen it all the day;
There’s something quare that wasn’t there when first ye wint away. . . .”

“It’s just the Army life, mother, the drill, the left and right,
That puts the stiffinin’ in yer spine and locks yer jaw up tight. . . .”

“There’s something in your eyes, Michael, an’ how they stare and stare –
You’re lookin’ at me now, me boy, as if I wasn’t there. . . .”

“It’s just the things I’ve seen, mother, the sights that come and come,
A bit o’ broken, bloody pulp that used to be a chum. . . .”

“There’s something on your heart, Michael, that makes ye wake at night,
And often when I hear ye moan, I trimble in me fright. . . .”

“It’s just a man I killed, mother, a mother’s son like me;
It seems he’s always hauntin’ me, he’ll never let me be. . . .”

“But maybe he was bad, Michael, maybe it was right
To kill the inimy you hate in fair and honest fight. . . .”

“I did not hate at all, mother ; he never did me harm;
I think he was a lad like me, who worked upon a farm. . . .”

“And what’s it all about, Michael; why did you have to go,
A quiet, peaceful lad like you, and we were happy so? . . .”

“It’s thim that’s up above, mother, it’s thim that sits an’ rules;
We’ve got to fight the wars they make, it’s us as are the fools. . . .”

“And what will be the end, Michael, and what’s the use, I say,
Of fightin’ if whoever wins it’s us that’s got to pay? . . .”

“Oh, it will be the end, mother, when lads like him and me,
That sweat to feed the ones above, decide that we’ll be free. . . .”

“And when will that day come, Michael, and when will fightin’ cease,
And simple folks may till their soil and live and love in peace? . . .”

“It’s coming soon and soon, mother, it’s nearer every day,
When only men who work and sweat will have a word to say;
When all who earn their honest bread in every land and soil
Will claim the Brotherhood of Man, the Comradeship of Toil;
When we, the Workers, all demand: `What are we fighting for?’ . . .
Then, then we’ll end that stupid crime, that devil’s madness — War.”

Robert William Service

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So, are ALL politicians deadbeats?

One of my favorite lines by Robert Service is "A promise made is a debt unpaid."

If you can name the poem, you can consider yourself awarded a paper star, like in grade-school.

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Suicide, or death by old age?

Robert Service, did he die by suicide, or old age? In his poem the munition maker he seems suicidal, but I don’t know if he’s just really old or dying. Wiki doesn’t tell me!! Help please!
Okay. I don’t think any of you read the info. Did ROBERT SERVICE die by old age or suicide? Gosh, oblivious much?

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Remember Sam McGrew?

A bunch of the boys were whooping it up in the Malamute saloon;
The kid that handles the music-box was hitting a jag-time tune;
Back of the bar, in a solo game, sat Dangerous Dan McGrew,
And watching his luck was hi light-o’-love, the lady that’s known as Lou.
When out of the night, which was fifty below, and into the din and the glare,
There stumbled a miner fresh from the creeks, dog-dirty, and loaded for bear.
He looked like a man with a foot in the grave, and scarcely the strength of a louse,
Yet he tilted a poke of dust on the bar, and he called for drinks for the house.
There was none could place the stranger’s face, though we searched ourselves for a clue;
But we drank his health, and the last to drink was dangerous Dan McGrew.

This poem was to go on to earn Robert Service half a million pounds on its own!

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Oral Interpretation?

My piece for prose is The Nightmare at 20,000 feet by Richard Mathewson and my poetry piece is the cremation of Sam McGee by Robert Service. I don’t like the poem. Does anyone have any suggestions that i can replace it with.

It should have different characters in the poem so it can be a children’s poem. This is for a speech and debate tournament and should be 8-10 minutes. It should be one so that i could put a wide range of personality into it with different gestures, not one where you have the “poet’s voice” like in shows where you see people wearing sunglasses and snap and everything.

Its being judged based on its liveliness and voice dictation acting not dullness and poem soundness. They don’t like it when the dictation makes the rhymes noticeable so its important if t he poem can be read like a story. It it should be able to flow like sentences so a poem contructed of fragments doesn’t work either.

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SO! What does this phrase mean?

the phrase is:

So the stranger stumbles across the room and flops down there like a fool.

I need an explanation to what this means, it’s from the poem The Shooting of Dan McGrew by Robert Service.

Please help!

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Need help with a Call of The Wild project

Okay I have to do a project for English and its on Call of The Wild. I have to relate the poem “The Cremation of Sam McGee” by Robert Service to Call of the Wild in a multi-paragraph essay.

I also have to write a multi-paragraph essay that has 4 references to the title in the novel and explain how Jack London’s use of auditory imagery enhances the reading experience.

If you can help at all thanks that would be great.! :)

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